Best educational music apps 2012

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Make Me Music is the newest app app by developer FeeFiFoFun . Combining free musical play with a wide variety of instruments, toddlers and preschoolers will enjoy creating their own melodies in this beautifully illustrated app.

Keys Kids Play HD: Fun Musical App for Kids!
Keys Kids Play HD is a fun musical app created for both iPhone and iPad by developer Toward Mobile. If you are looking for a cute first musical app for your toddler or preschooler, this is sure to be a hit. With four different sections, the app provides lots of music and sound interactions for kids aged one and u

AtPlayMusic Recorder: Top New Musical App for Kids!
AtPlayMusic Recorder is a new top music app from new developers AtPlayMusic. Looking to learn more about the recorder, or rather, looking to help your kids master the recorder? This app is an in-depth tool to teach a beginner the basics of playing the recorder. By the end of the first lesson, musicians will be able to play two songs. Fun Educational Apps TOP PICK!

Go Go Xylo: Top Fun Musical Apps for Kids
Go Go Xylo by Barrett Productions, LLC is a top fun musical app for kids and grown up! It will let you and your kids play with a virtual xylophone, along with many other instruments in a variety of ways. Playing the xylophone can be so much fun. Whether you are a musician or not, it’s time to Go Go Xylo and have a little fun

My 1st Songs Collection – Promo Code Giveaway!
Following our review on My 1st Songs Collection HD, a top musical apps for kids and thanks to Little Learning Tots, Fun Educational Apps is glad to offer you the chance to win one of 5 promo codes.

I usually just do a year-end list on Web 2.0 Applications For Education and many other topics, but it gets a little crazy having to review all of my zillion posts at once. So, to make it easier for me — and perhaps, to make it a little more useful to readers — I’m going to be publishing mid-year lists, too. These won’t be ranked, unlike my year-end “The Best…” lists, and just because a site appears on a mid-year list doesn’t guarantee it will be included in an end-of-the-year one. But, at least, I won’t have to review all my year’s posts in December…
As usual, in order to make this list, a site had to be:
* accessible to English Language Learners and non-tech savvy users.
* free-of-charge.
* appropriate for classroom use.
* completely browser-based with no download required.
It’s possible that a few of these sites began in 2011, but, if so, I’m including them in this list because they were “new to me” in 2012.

ere are my twenty-nine choices for The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education In 2012 — So Far (NOT in order of preference):
Slide.ly looks good and is very similar to Animoto. You can search for photos online or use your own, and easily combine them with music to create musical video-like slideshows.
Croak.it lets you easily record a thirty second message with a computer microphone. You then get a unique url address that you can share. No registration is necessary.
Venngage is an easy tool for creating online infographics. Like several other sites on The Best Resources For Creating Infographics list, it has a number of templates where you just add your info, click publish, and you get an embeddable image (oops, they appear to have recently begun charging, though you can get a two week trial for free).
Zoho announced Zoho Sites, a super-easy “drag-and-drop” website builder. It doesn’t get much easier to create a nice-looking website. You can read more about it at TechCrunch.
Infogr.am looks like a pretty easy tool for creating infographics that can be linked to or embedded. The selection of templates is pretty limited, but the site is still in beta. The main problem with the site is that you can only log-in using a social media site like Facebook or Twitter. That makes it usable for teachers, but, since those sites are blocked in most schools for students, they would not be able to create their own. (UPDATE: It appears that you can now register just using an email address)
Memplai looks like a good online video editor that can incorporate photos and videos.
Easel.ly is hands-down the easiest tool I’ve seen on the Web to create infographics. You just “drag-and-drop” a variety of themes, type in your data, and you’ve got a great infographic.
Record MP3 lets you, without having to register, create an audio recording that you can save on your computer and/or save on their site (a link is provided). It’s very simple to use, though I’m not sure what the maximum audio recording length is nor how long they keep it on their server. My recording uploaded quickly using Internet Explorer. However, it would never upload when in Firefox.
TED unveiled a new education website , TED Ed. This new site, using the videos from that new education initiative and any other YouTube video, lets teachers create interactive quizzes that can supposedly be tracked. Where the creation tool could really be a valuable learning asset, though, would be by having students take the videos and create the quizzes that, in turn, could be used by their classmates and other students.
Thinglink lets you upload or grab an image or video off the web and annotate items with the image or video super-easily. It basically looks like a photo in the Picture Word Inductive Model, just online. You can read how I use it here.
ImageSpike is a new web tool that is supposed to do just about the same thing as Thinglink. You can read about the differences between the two here.
And MarQueed is like a Thinglink and ImageSpike on steroids and allows collaborative annotation. You can read more about it here.
Though I’ve used clozes (fill-in-the-blank/gap-fill) for several years, this is the first time a free and easy-to-use site like LearnClick has been available (there have been other cloze-creation sites, but none that I thought were student-friendly). LearnClick makes it super-simple and free to create and post interactive clozes online so students from different classes — in fact, students anywhere — can try completing them. And they’re much more enjoyable to create, too!

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