Computer language android apps written

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It’s primarily a combination of C and Java code. The core of it is Linux, so that is all C (with a wee bit of assembly). The Dalvik VM is also written in C. But much of what people think of as Android itself is written in Java that executes on top of the Dalvik VM.

When starting on the path of programming, it’s important you invest your time wisely in choosing to learn something that will both benefit you in the immediate future with visible results on your platform of choice, as well as getting you set up for any future languages. Your choice will depend upon a number of factors, so let’s take a look at their characteristics, ease of learning, and likelihood of earning you a living. I’ll also show you some code to display “hello world”, the first application many people write when learning a new language.
In this first part, we’ll be looking at languages used to program software – as in applications which run on the computer or mobile devices. Next time we’ll look at the increasingly significant area of web-programming languages, used to create dynamic websites and interactive browser-based user interfaces.There are two previous articles in this series which discuss some fundamentals of any programming languages, so if you’re new to programming then be sure to read those too:

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Which Programming Language Should You Learn For Software Development?
November 4, 2011
By James Bruce
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When starting on the path of programming, it’s important you invest your time wisely in choosing to learn something that will both benefit you in the immediate future with visible results on your platform of choice, as well as getting you set up for any future languages. Your choice will depend upon a number of factors, so let’s take a look at their characteristics, ease of learning, and likelihood of earning you a living. I’ll also show you some code to display “hello world”, the first application many people write when learning a new language.
In this first part, we’ll be looking at languages used to program software – as in applications which run on the computer or mobile devices. Next time we’ll look at the increasingly significant area of web-programming languages, used to create dynamic websites and interactive browser-based user interfaces.
There are two previous articles in this series which discuss some fundamentals of any programming languages, so if you’re new to programming then be sure to read those too:
Variables and Datatypes
Functions, Loops and Decision Making


Java

Java is a full object-oriented language, strongly typed, with an extensive feature set focused on networking and cross-platform compatibility. Applications written in Java can run on virtually any OS – though the performance won’t be as good as something designed to run natively.
It is the language of choice for most Computer Science courses, and consequently almost everyone has at least a little Java programming experience. Android applications are written in Java too, though you can’t simply run a regular Java app on your Android mobile nor vice-versa.
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C/C++

Though actually separate languages, they are often grouped together, as C++ is basically an enhanced version of C, adding object oriented features. C++ is the serious programmer’s language of choice, forming the basis of most computer games and most advanced Windows software. It’s high performance, but requires a lot more precision on the programmers part when it comes to memory management and consequently has a steep learning curve. Not recommended for absolute beginners.
Likelihood Of Making You Money
With less competition than Java, C++ programmers will always be in demand and paid well, especially in the games industry.

C#
Pronounced C sharp, this is Microsoft’s clone of Java (though the two have since diverged with more pronounced differences) – a general purpose object-oriented strongly-typed language. Performance is good, though not as fast as C++. Software written in C# requires .Net framework to run and is Windows-only.

Visual Basic
Another of Microsoft’s contributions, Visual Basic is an event-driven language focussed on simple GUI-based apps. Event-driven means that the code you write will generally be reacting to what the user does – what happens when they click that button, for example. It’s incredibly easy to learn and get a simple app up and running, but ultimately limited and perhaps not the best for actually learning fundamental programming concepts.

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